Also: America’s “Robot Belt,” and the rise and fall of the family road trip.

What We’re Following

Pitt stop: On Wednesday, Uber laid off more than 100 employees who piloted its self-driving cars in Pittsburgh and San Francisco. The move signals a dramatic scaling back of the company’s autonomous vehicle testing, coming four months after one of Uber’s AVs struck and killed a pedestrian in Arizona. Testing is set to resume on much more limited routes in August; in Pittsburgh, sources say the AVs will only operate autonomously on a suburban test track and along a set route to HQ.

CityLab’s Laura Bliss has the story on what this means for the future of autonomous car testing: Uber Just Laid Off Its Pittsburgh Autonomous Car Drivers

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What It Means to Be From Brett Kavanaugh’s Washington

Many of the most consequential legal jobs are overwhelmingly concentrated in Washington. And for the most part, it’s not Trump’s Washington.

David Fontana

America’s Robot Geography

The robotics industry is powered by high-tech centers as well as manufacturing hubs—with a distinct “Robot Belt” in the Midwest.

Richard Florida

Police Killings and Violence Are Driving Black People Crazy

Two new studies point to how police killings and violence harm the mental health of African Americans and students—even those who have not been exposed to the incidents.

Brentin Mock

The Rise and Fall of the Family-Vacation Road Trip

Richard Ratay, the author of Don’t Make Me Pull Over!: An Informal History of the Family Road Trip, discusses the factors that turned road trips from an individual adventurer’s pursuit into a family activity—and those that led to their decline.

Ashley Fetters

Getting a Bird’s Eye View of the World’s Subway Systems

Online artists are tracing transit lines onto aerial photos, offering a new way to visualize an often hidden mode of transit.

David Montgomery


Room to Grow

A photo shows children playing on a playground.
(Christopher Aluka Berry/Reuters)

Are you a parent? Have you lived in a city? Then you can help CityLab with a new reporting project. We’re starting a new series, called Room to Grow, all about raising small children in cities. For the rest of the year, we’ll bring you stories from around the globe on local issues that affect early childhood development. And while we’ll be speaking with experts, we also want to hear from parents themselves.

Help inform our reporting by taking a few moments to complete a survey.


What We’re Reading

Elon Musk pledges to fix Flint’s water problems (Governing)

Why Charlotte is one of Ben Carson’s models for HUD’s work requirements (NPR)

Space in New York’s cemeteries is getting scarce and expensive (The Guardian)

The Baltimore City Fire Department is getting heated about bike lanes (Streetsblog)

The cautionary tale Detroit can tell Silicon Valley (Fast Company)


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About the Author

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