Also: The rise of “urban tech,” and the other toxic toll of lead.

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***

What We’re Following

Local lockdown: The migrant family separation crisis brought to light the large number of places in the United States where ICE can send immigrant detainees. Just how many are locally run or controlled? About 850, it turns out.

Some of those facilities are primarily for immigrants; many others are local jails or county prisons that rent out beds to federal authorities for immigrant detention. To find out what kinds of places make these contracts with the feds, CityLab and ESRI mapped out the local and federal facilities with contracts that can be used to detain immigrants.

A map shows immigrant detention contracts overlayed with Trump's county-level share of the vote.

The map above shows the location of these facilities alongside Trump's share of the vote in 2016. As it turns out, the economic value of these contracts has appealed even to places that are otherwise immigrant-friendly—some are even considered “sanctuary cities” because they limit police cooperation with ICE. CityLab’s Tanvi Misra analyzes how federal funding, local job creation, and a lack of oversight have spread immigrant detention facilities across the country: Where Cities Help Detain Immigrants

Correction: Yesterday’s newsletter included an erroneous link when discussing “little vehicles.” The correct link is here. Thanks to the readers who brought it to our attention.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Rise of ‘Urban Tech’

From food-delivery startups to mapping and co-living companies, technology focused on urban systems is drawing billions of dollars in venture capital.

Richard Florida

Shelter Design Can Help People Recover From Homelessness

Many homeless shelters are designed to house as many people as possible—not to empower them while they’re there.

Jill Pable

Cheap Sensors Are Democratizing Air-Quality Data

A new generation of inexpensive, portable air-quality sensors is making it easier for citizen groups and individuals to monitor the air around them.

Jason Plautz

Lead's Other Toxic Toll: Fertility

New research sounds the alarm on how high levels of lead in topsoil can reduce birth rates.

Mimi Kirk

Say Hello to Full Employment

Want to know where the economy is headed? Look at Des Moines.

Annie Lowrey

A Soviet Synthpop Tribute to the Private Vehicle

A love for cars among today’s middle-aged Muscovites surely traces back to this song from their teen years.

Mark Byrnes


Eyes on the Tweets

If you’ve been binge-watching Queer Eye, maybe you’ve wondered what else deserves the fierce makeover treatment—so how about cities? That’s what Sarah Iannarone, the associate director at First Stop Portland, tweeted up this weekend when she suggested that “five fabulous women” across city-related professions should have a show where they fix cities that are making “stupid planning and policy decisions.”

Twitter chimed in with replies ranging from jubilant Queer Eye memes to “yas queens,” (and *sigh* mansplaining), but the viral enthusiasm suggests there just might be an audience for an urbanist-savvy reality television show. Here are some of our favorite comments from the thread:

@LXBeckett: Oh, Toronto. It’s adorable that you call yourself a City within a Park, but your parks could use some serious love. Let’s talk about what it takes to truly makeover your green spaces.

@grenadine: Wait you tore THAT down? Oh girl

@slashklc: We're going with a blend of classic pieces, like building efficiency, and some trendier, flashier items, like community solar, so you can really mix-and-match the climate solution that's right for you.

And then of course, the show needs a name. Suggestions included Urbanista Eye for the Street Guy, She-ty Council, and even Broad City. Got any bright ideas? Drop us a line at hello@citylab.com.


What We’re Reading

Texas cities are exploring ways to protect residents from deportation (Next City)

How tariffs on China could slow the e-bike revolution (Mobility Lab)

Who owns the space under cities? (The Guardian)

Can a new kind of payday lender help the poor? (The Nation)


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