Also: Remembering a bipartisan push against exclusionary zoning, and the homelessness problem we don’t talk about.

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What We’re Following

Take the e-bike: Docked bikeshare systems are finally getting a boost, thanks to e-bikes. New York’s Citi Bike added 200 of the pedal-assist two-wheelers on Monday, signaling a ramp-up to 1,000 e-bikes total by the time the L train shuts down in April (AM New York). Elsewhere, e-bikes have zipped in via dockless companies like Jump and Lime, but docked bikeshare has been slower to catch up. San Francisco’s Ford GoBike added e-bikes this spring, and D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare tweeted last week about potentially adding some of its own.

But the booming industry faces a potential roadblock: tariffs. On Thursday, the U.S. government will begin collecting a 25 percent tariff on Chinese-made goods, including electric bicycles and e-bike motors (Bicycling). While it isn’t clear which companies source parts from China, the North American Bikeshare Association, which lobbies for the industry, says the tariffs will “significantly increase the cost to implement and operate bikeshare for cities” and will “undoubtedly harm the bikeshare industry” even as it begins picking up in a big way.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What a Bipartisan Push Against Exclusionary Zoning Looks Like

Back in the first Bush Administration, HUD tried to rein in local housing restrictions. It didn’t work. But today’s zoning reformers should take note.

Nolan Gray

The Homelessness Problem We Don’t Talk About

The barriers formerly incarcerated people face are creating a housing crisis—and no one is paying attention.

Tanvi Misra

Can Elon Musk Save Baseball?

The embattled Tesla CEO is proposing a 3.6 mile “Dugout Loop” to help get L.A. fans to Dodger Stadium.

Laura Bliss

Why Should Cities Bear the Cost of Trump’s Rallies?

Donald Trump thinks Washington, D.C. charged him too much to host his parade. But he still owes a lot of cities money for past events.

Tanvi Misra

Tong-Wielding ‘Trash Runners’ Fight Litter in Shanghai

Picking up trash while jogging is not everyone’s idea of a good time, but in Shanghai, it’s an increasingly popular way to socialize (and keep litter in check).

Ryan Krull

An Early Glimpse of London's Eternally Somber Euston Station

As seen in this 1968 newsreel, not even Elizabeth II’s odd, feathered hat could enliven the modern transit hub at its grand opening.

Feargus O'Sullivan


What We’re Reading

A New Orleans neighborhood comes together under an elevated expressway (Next City)

Fewer Americans uproot themselves for a job (Wall Street Journal)

Harlem’s trash bins were overflowing. So the city took 223 away (New York Times)

In Baltimore, Ben Carson’s fall from grace (AP)


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