Also: Is this America’s nicest bus station? And five designs that help kids navigate cities.

What We’re Following

Drowned out: No one knew what to expect when white nationalists got a permit to reprise Charlottesville’s chaotic Unite the Right rally in Washington, D.C.. The rally’s organizers had put in to host 400 people. But about 20 to 30 showed up, quietly escorted in and out of the city for a barely audible demonstration on Sunday.

Perhaps tradition could have predicted some of what did happen: thousands of counter-protesters from all corners of the city gathered to resist a hateful ideology. Together, they drowned out the white nationalists through sheer numbers and volume, repeating a pattern that has recurred over the past few decades when white nationalists came to Washington. “We need to confront them directly,” said one activist. “To say wherever you go, wherever you try to come and bring your message, you will be opposed; and you will be outnumbered.” CityLab’s Tanvi Misra and Sarah Holder were on the scene Sunday to get the story: How D.C. Drowned Out the White Nationalists.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Is This America’s Nicest Bus Station?

The Salesforce Transit Center, San Francisco’s $2-plus billion bus and (someday) high-speed rail terminal, has been billed as the Grand Central Station of the West. But it might just become the Bay Area’s answer to the High Line.

Benjamin Schneider

It's Way Too Hot on the New York City Subway

Temperatures on New York City transit platforms are reaching past 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Many cars aren’t much better. How did we get here?

Laura Bliss

Yes, Black People Brew Beer, Too

As craft beer breweries pop up in cities across America, Michael Potter and Day Bracey want to make sure that African American brewers are not left off the map.

Brentin Mock

The Segregation of Our Everyday Lives

A new study analyzes Twitter data and finds that racial segregation not only divides us based on where we live, but how we travel around cities.

Richard Florida

View From the Protests: Dhaka Should Go Car Free

For nearly two weeks, Bangladesh’s capital city has been riven with protests following the death of two students in a traffic incident. A long-time Dhaka resident reports on the situation and offers a solution to the traffic problem.

Debra Efroymson


Block Party

An illustration shows "Kiddicraft Interlocking Building Cubes"
(Chas Saunter, hilarypagetoys.com)

In some ways, childhood development is a process of engaging with the design of the world. From toys and homes, to schools and playgrounds, growing up means watching the space around kids open up. In her new book, The Design of Childhood, design critic Alexandra Lange traces the history of child-centered design—from Lego blocks to city blocks—and explains how family life has shaped how we design cities. She spoke with CityLab’s Amanda Kolson Hurley to break down her book into five key objects and places. Read the second installment in our “Room to Grow” series: How Kids Learn to Navigate the City (and the World), in Five Designs


What We’re Reading

Google tracks your movements, even if you’ve told it not to (AP)

Heat: the next big inequality issue (The Guardian)

How ride-hailing drivers use “longhauling” to maximize fares (Wall Street Journal)

The lessons of the Seattle plane crash (The Atlantic)


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