Also: More cities want “democracy vouchers,” and why this housing spike is different.

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***

What We’re Following

What’s next, special elex: You’ve certainly heard about the nail-biter special election in Ohio’s reliably red 12th congressional district. At first glance, it looks like the shift in voting patterns there comes down to the same demographic factors we’ve been talking about all election season: suburbs and Millennials.

Turnout surged in the suburbs outside Columbus and lagged in rural areas, giving Democrats a chance in this too-close-to-call election (New York Times). “Suburban women, in particular here, are the ones that are really turned off,” Ohio Governor John Kasich said Sunday on ABC’s This Week. “And you add to that the Millennials, and you have it very close. It’s really kind of shocking because this should be just a slam dunk (for Republicans) and it’s not.”

While that contest got all the headlines, other primary results from Tuesday show progressive shifts for Democrats ahead of the fall election season.

  • In St. Louis County, Wesley Bell took down incumbent county prosecutor Bob McCulloch, who faced his first election since the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson back in 2014. (Riverfront Times)
  • Via ballot measure, Missouri voters overrode a legislative move to curb union power. (NYT)
  • In Michigan, Rashida Tlaib is poised to become the first Muslim woman elected to Congress after beating out much of Detroit’s Democratic establishment in the deep-blue 13th congressional district, formerly held by Representative John Conyers. (CNN)

Correction: Yesterday, we mistakenly referred to Nikuya Walker as Charlottesville’s first black mayor. Walker is the city’s first black female mayor.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

More Cities Want to Embrace ‘Democracy Vouchers’

Following Seattle’s example, other cities want to give voters cash vouchers to donate to local candidates.

Tanvi Misra

Climate Report: Not Good

In a week full of climate-related terrors, don’t expect to find much good news in the American Meteorological Society’s annual report card on the state of the planet.

Nicole Javorsky

Who Rents Their Home in America? Here’s What the Data Says.

Many homeownership trends have remained largely the same since 1960—with a few noteworthy shifts.

David Montgomery

How a Political Crisis Fueled an Urban Planner’s Mayoral Campaign

After conservative Doug Ford, the newly elected Premier of Ontario, announced that Toronto will lose 18 city council seats, Jennifer Keesmaat decided to run for office.

Chris Bateman

Where Did All Those Goats Come From?

The mystery behind a boisterous scene in Boise

Marina Koren


Blowing Bubbles

Housing prices are cooking. In cities nationwide, they’re back at or above pre-recession levels. The prices of homes are rising faster than the rate of inflation, in some places by a factor of three, as in Seattle or San Francisco. But the latest surge in housing prices isn’t necessarily evidence for a bubble: Homebuyers now face fierce competition, rather a speculative craze drumming up new construction. CityLab’s Kriston Capps writes there just isn’t the make-a-buck building boom to merit a housing bubble.


What We’re Reading

Ben Carson declared mission accomplished in East St. Louis, where public housing is still a disaster (ProPublica)

School segregation is on the rise in Boston (Next City)

Chasing the startup economy, universities reshape urban real estate (Curbed)

In Baltimore, the gap between white and black homeownership persists (NPR)

The injustice of highway pollution (Streetsblog)


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