Also: How to build a Rust Belt art boom, and the Postal Service eyes a new demographic.

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What We’re Following

Cap’s lock: New York City just put the reins on ride-hailing. On Wednesday afternoon, the city council voted to impose a slate of first-of-their-kind regulations on transportation network companies such as Uber and Lyft. The legislation, which Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to sign, includes a one-year cap on the number of for-hire vehicles operating on the city’s streets. It also sets a minimum wage for drivers.

After years of a more hands-off approach, the city has seen more than 63,000 vehicles provide 159 million trips a year. While the bill aims to curb congestion and level the playing field for taxis, ride-hailing companies argue the new rules will diminish their ability to serve more areas of the city. As more New Yorkers turn to ride-hailing apps over the struggling public transportation systems, all eyes are on what happens next. CityLab’s Laura Bliss has the story: New York City Just Changed the Uber Game

Correction: Yesterday, we misidentified Charlottesville’s first black mayor. It was Charles Barbour, not Maurice Cox. We regret the error.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How to Build a Rust Belt Art Boom

Aaron Ott, the first-ever curator of public art at Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Art Gallery, talks about leading an uncommon cultural initiative across Western New York.

Mark Byrnes

Ghost Bikes, Infrastructure of Grief

Part memorial, part protest symbol, these all-white bicycles mark the places where cyclists have been killed by cars.

Andrew Small

How Millennials Can Save the Postal Service

A new report suggests snail mail makes young adults feel special. USPS sees that as a chance to stage a turnaround.

Sarah Holder

AR Is Transforming Tech. What Can It Do for Cities?

If it isn’t already there, augmented reality is coming to a device near you. Cities need to work to ensure that AR makes the leap from “cool experience,” to a technology that improves residents’ lives.

Stephen Goldsmith and Chris Bousquet

Arne Duncan: ‘Everyone Says They Value Education, but Their Actions Don’t Follow’

The former secretary of education talks about the “lies” he thinks undergirds the American public school system, and the unintended consequences that can come with attempts to reform it.

Alia Wong


Rent to Own

A chart shows the likelihood of Americans owning homes by age.

In most phases of American life, homeownership is more common than renting, but there’s one exception: 20-somethings. As the chart above shows, the likelihood of living in an owned home falls in your 20s and then increases as you reach your 30s. The trend isn’t surprising: It takes capital to buy a house, and people in their 20s are more mobile and less likely to be married with children. And while those major life events have shifted a little later in life for Millennials, the general trend holds across generations. However, the effects of income and race are dramatic, and have created a gap in homeownership that has persisted for decades. CityLab’s David Montgomery explains who owns a home in America, in 12 charts.


What We’re Reading

Trump’s newsprint tariffs hasten local newspapers’ demise (New York Times)

Police defend use of “bait trucks” on Chicago’s South Side (Chicago Block Club)

A haunting speculative proposal for the Grenfell Tower memorial (Fast Company)

How L.A. can gain housing (and transit ridership) without infuriating the neighbors (Los Angeles Times)

The Trump Administration is not bringing back asbestos (Slate)


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