Also: The benefits of living near your parents, and how America became a nation of mattress stores.

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What We’re Following

Storm watch: Last week, we wrote about a choice facing Houston-area voters over whether to approve a $2.5 billion bond to overhaul the region’s flood infrastructure. Saturday—one year after Hurricane Harvey swamped 204,000 homes and killed more than 50 people—Harris County voters threw overwhelming support behind the move. About 85 percent of voters supported the measure, according to the Houston Chronicle. The package will fund more than 200 potential projects, including the widening of bayous and channels and voluntary home buyouts.

Today, CityLab’s Nicole Javorsky reports on a more modest effort in the Florida Keys that sprung out of the recovery from last year’s Hurricane Irma. There, a community land trust is aiming to address the vulnerability of the region’s affordable housing, which shelters much of the Keys’ tourism-related workforce. Their solution: affordable storm-proof cottages designed to withstand the next hurricane—and allow workers to remain a part of their community.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

After Job Loss, Living Near Parents Helps Adults Recover

According to a new study, it can take decades for someone who was laid off to make up lost earnings, but for those who live near parents who provide childcare, that time is halved.

Tanvi Misra

Now Entering Sleepopolis

How did America become a nation of mattress stores?

Sarah Holder

Chicago’s ‘Shapes’ Return 50 Years Later

John Massey’s minimalist designs are back on State Street in the Loop for the rest of August.

Mark Byrnes

Berkeley Police Arrested Protesters and Tweeted Their Photos

On August 5, counter-protesters showed up at a far-right, “No to Marxism” rally in Berkeley, California. The Berkeley Police Department arrested 20 people. And then it put some of their names and booking photos on Twitter.

Scott Morris

‘We Are All Accumulating Mountains of Things’

How online shopping and cheap prices turned Americans into hoarders

Alana Semuels


What We’re Reading

What would cities look like if they were designed by mothers? (The Guardian)

How the Trump administration went easy on small-town police abuses (ProPublica)

Your city isn’t changing as fast as you think (Strong Towns)

A tactical urbanist is pasting the untold stories of enslaved people in Richmond (Next City)


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