Also: A shakeout for dockless bikesharing, and the global tourism backlash.

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What We’re Following

A grim anniversary: It’s been almost a year since white supremacists tore through Charlottesville, torches blazing, for a “Unite the Right” rally that left one counter-protester dead. The reckoning of that rally—nationally and locally—isn’t over. A number of things have changed, though, from the removal of Confederate statues in more than 100 cities to the election of Charlottesville’s first black woman mayor.

But “preventing the next Charlottesville” isn’t as simple as resetting a city government and banning bad actors. While the Virginia college town’s legal challenge prevented a second rally, an anniversary rally is coming to Washington, D.C., this weekend, bringing all the security concerns for the city, the federal government, and even public transit. CityLab’s Sarah Holder reports on the fallout from last year’s violence, and the efforts taken since then to stop white supremacists from taking over an American city again.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Time For a Dockless Bikesharing Shakeout?

Blaming regulations, the China-based bikesharing company Ofo is retreating from the U.S., just one year after it first arrived in Seattle.

Andrew Small

The Global Tourism Backlash

A surge in tourism has led to a backlash in cities where residents feel overrun. How can these cities use tourism to their benefit?

Richard Florida

One Way to Boost Minority Representation: Letting People Vote More Than Once

In response to civil rights litigation, one Orange County town will experiment with “cumulative voting” in 2020.

Jack Herrera

Inside a Pedestrian-First ‘Superblock’

A short film reveals the inner workings of Barcelona’s celebrated—and controversial—street revamps.

Laura Bliss

The Long Road to Mexico City’s First Elected Woman Mayor

Claudia Sheinbaum Pardo’s election last month was, in part, the result of a decades-long movement in Mexico by feminists and women in politics.

Martha Pskowski

The Serious Mission Behind a $50 Million Comedy Museum

The struggling Western New York city of Jamestown has big dreams for its new comedy museum. Can it live up to the hype?

Michael Stahl


Mailbag

Matthew McConaughey is pictured.
Matthew McConaughey says everything is alright, alright, alright on Austin's Capital Metro. (Harrison McClary/Reuters)

Yesterday, we shared our picks for which celebrities should voice public transit announcements, and asked for your ideas, too. It wasn’t a hot-train minute before readers delivered. Here are a few we loved from our inbox and on our social platforms:

  • Jeff H. from Sioux City wrote that fictional characters with unique voices, such as Elmer Fudd from Looney Toons or Roseanne Roseannadanna from SNL’s “Weekend Update,” would catch the attention of transit riders.
  • Merrill S. from Washington, D.C. suggested two calm-voiced icons: the naturalist broadcaster David Attenborough and beloved television personality Fred Rogers. (We have to imagine they could put you at ease, no matter how long of a delay they’re announcing.)
  • We also got great suggestions on Twitter and Facebook, including Matthew McConaughey for Austin, Jeff Bridges or Snoop Dogg for Los Angeles, and Dave Chappelle for D.C. The voiceover talents of Kristen Bell from Frozen and Holly Hunter from The Incredibles got nominations that any transit agency would be wise to commission.

Thanks to everyone who wrote in!


What We’re Reading

One year later, Charlottesville’s mayor wants conversations about race (NPR)

Cities’ offers to Amazon are secrets even to many city leaders (New York Times)

The future of urban transportation is… valet parking? (Curbed)

Asimov’s three rules of robotics, updated for drones in cities (Fast Company)

China dominates the list of cities with the fastest growing economies (Quartz)


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