Also: Why Philly is on the federal government’s shaming list, and the Olmsted papers you didn’t know you needed.

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What We’re Following

Who gets a ride?: As D.C. braces for the United the Right rally this Sunday, even the logistics of mobility are political. On message boards and Facebook groups, Uber and Lyft drivers—particularly people of color—are weighing whether or not to drive white supremacists or white nationalists to the rally, the Washington Post reports. They’re also considering how they might respond if they’re paired with racist riders. Uber and Lyft have reminded drivers that they can refuse service to riders who are disrespectful or make them feel unsafe.

The Washington Metro also faced controversy earlier this week when a transit agency union said it wouldn’t participate in plans to provide separate railcars for rallygoers. The agency’s chairman disputed the claim, saying there were no such plans in the first place (WAMU). We’ll be monitoring the rally and counter-protest over the weekend.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Why Philadelphia Is on the Federal Government’s Shaming List

“To be quite honest it kind of feels like they’re a bit obsessed with the city,” an immigrants’ rights activist said of the Department of Justice.

Tanvi Misra

The Olmsted Papers You Didn’t Know You Needed

The materials, including drafts of his writings, family letters and journals, correspondences with colleagues, and project proposals, piece together a unique glimpse into the landscape architect’s creative process.

Nicole Javorsky

Memphis: Spying on Activists Is Just Good Police Work

As an activist, Tami Sawyer was monitored by the Memphis Police Department. She was elected to the Shelby County Board of Commissioners on August 3, and can now keep track of the agents who were tracking her.

Brentin Mock

How To Ruin a Historic Town, According to 1970s British News

A clip charting the redevelopment of the city of Aylesbury shows its age.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Why Did So Many Die in Quebec’s Heat Wave?

When temperatures in Montréal spiked, living alone proved to be deadly.

Malcolm Araos


The New Bronx

Pop up store, 945 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 2017 (Camilo José Vergara)

In the latest installment of his Crossroads series for CityLab, Camilo José Vergara returns to Southern Boulevard and Westchester Avenue, the heart of a Latino neighborhood in the Bronx. Decades after photographing the intersection, Vergara sees a contrast between the past and present of the economically devastated borough. Where abandoned buildings and empty lots have disappeared, they have given way to Puerto Rican folk murals, playgrounds, and fruit stands. Take a look at his photos of the neighborhood “exemplified by this lively, peaceful crossroads.”


What We’re Reading

What’s the right number of taxis (or Uber or Lyft cars) in a city? (New York Times)

Manhole covers: a window into a city’s soul (The Guardian)

This apartment building will pay you to ditch your car (Fast Company)

Democrats still want infrastructure week to happen (Vox)

The sensors that power smart cities are a hacker’s dream (Wired)


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