Also: What brought down the bridge in Genoa? And Ben Carson is a YIMBY now.

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What We’re Following

Stuck in the station: We’ve lost count of how many “infrastructure weeks” the Trump administration has tried to hold, but by now it’s clear that the promise of a $1 trillion federal spending spree is all but dead in Congress. There’s a more basic breakdown in infrastructure spending going on, too: The Federal Transit Administration is sitting on $1.4 billion that’s supposed to go to transit projects, and there’s no clear reason why it hasn’t been doled out.

Nearly five months after the funding passed into law, 17 rail and rapid bus projects in 14 cities are awaiting federal grants, worrying transit agencies, commuters, advocates, and political leaders who championed the projects. As CityLab’s Laura Bliss reports, it’s hard not to see the heel-dragging as a sign of the administration’s hostility toward left-leaning urban centers, and to mass transit in particular. That’s why cities want to know: “Where’s the transit money you promised?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What Brought Down This Bridge in Genoa?

The disaster has focused attention on the state of infrastructure built during the nation’s postwar boom.

John Surico

Why Some Startups Move to the Bay Area (But Most Stay Put)

A new study explores startup migration and the benefits it brings.

Richard Florida

Ben Carson Is a YIMBY Now and Everything's Confusing

The HUD secretary's new attempt to roll back an Obama-era fair-housing rule has him wading into battle against exclusionary zoning.

Kriston Capps

Reining in Ride Hailing Is Critical

City leaders need to reckon with the reality that sometimes shared ride services are not part of the answer to urban congestion, argues transportation researcher Bruce Schaller.

Bruce Schaller

Building London’s Town of the Future

A 1970 film celebrates the construction of Thamesmead, the largest housing project development in the city’s history.

Feargus O'Sullivan



What We’re Reading

L.A.’s rail system will be the first in the U.S. to use scanners that detect explosives (Los Angeles Times)

Chicago faces a defining moment for police reform (The Intercept)

The White House corrects a false statement on black unemployment (Washington Post)

Why financial criminals use real estate to launder money (Curbed)

A conversation with John Legend about criminal justice reform (The Appeal)


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