Also: Racing the great Brooklyn-Queens divide, and our best-worst roommate stories.

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What We’re Following

Running dry: Flint’s water crisis has dragged on for well over four years, with many residents still drinking bottled water and pointing to corroded pipes that haven’t been replaced. They also point to the deliberate pace of the state’s investigation of itself. Now the highest official to face criminal charges for the city’s water crisis is about to go to trial—but he’s still on the job.

Back in June 2017, prosecutors indicted Nick Lyon, the director of Michigan’s Department of Health and Human Services, for involuntary manslaughter and misconduct in office in connection with the infamous lead contamination. With the support of Governor Rick Snyder, Lyon still leads his department even as the trial diverts the agency’s attention, as the chief medical executive also has been indicted.

The curious situation of top officials holding their jobs after being indicted in a notorious public health disaster has local leaders shaking their heads. “Obviously in America we have the presumption of innocence until proven guilty,” said Michigan Senate Minority Leader Jim Ananich, who lives in Flint. “But that doesn’t mean you get to keep your job, or not even go on paid or unpaid leave.” Anna Clark, the author of The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the America Urban Tragedy, has the latest in the saga, detailing the long, slow, and very expensive legal drama behind the Flint water crisis.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum Could Become Florida’s Next Governor

The 39-year-old progressive pulled off a surprise win in yesterday’s Democratic primary.

Shelton Hull

Racing the Great Brooklyn-Queens Divide

A rush-hour showdown by bike, car, subway, bus, and moped reveals the weaknesses in New York City’s transit coverage.  

John Surico

Our Best (and Worst) Roommate Stories

As college kids head back to school, it’s time to consider the joys and horrors of sharing your living space.

CityLab Staff

Single People Aren’t to Blame for the Loneliness Epidemic

The data show that unmarried Americans, and those who live alone, often aren’t isolated at all.

Bella DePaulo

Long Live the World’s Greatest Local TV News Theme

Philadelphia’s “Move Closer To Your World” has some new fans this week, thanks to a viral video.

Mark Byrnes


What We’re Reading

Miami will be underwater soon. Its drinking water could go first (Bloomberg)

How curbs became the new urban battleground (Wired)

Washington state joins 14 others in banning housing discrimination based on income source (Governing)

Quantifying New York City as an August ghost town (New York Times)

A day in the life of a city (PlanPhilly)


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