Also: The Obama Library after Rahm Emanuel, and a look into the Museum of Broken Windows.

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What We’re Following

She’s running. Progressives, anyway, will be tempted to conclude that Elizabeth Warren’s proposed American Housing and Economic Mobility Act—a far-reaching solution to the nation’s affordable-housing crisis—is a signal that she’s gunning for the White House in 2020. CityLab’s Kriston Capps weighs in on Warren’s new bill, announced this morning:

The bill itself doesn’t stand a chance: It would generate a half-trillion dollars for affordable housing subsidies by raising the estate tax. That alone marks it as DOA in this administration. Should Democrats regain the House, Senate, and eventually, the presidency, though, this bill might work to undo decades of housing segregation.

Warren’s plan, which includes incentives to generate new affordable housing and eliminate zoning laws that thwart new construction, could spur more than 3 million new units in 10 years—about the same number that the Low Income Housing Tax Credit has produced since 1987. As an added bonus, the law rethinks the Community Reinvestment Act to bolster financial regulations to ensure fair housing—a law that is currently in the crosshairs of Trump’s Treasury.

No question, Warren’s bill qualifies as a moonshot. Not only would it reverse a decades-long decline in spending on housing aid, it would target the barriers to safe and equitable housing that communities have long maintained at the local level. America’s far-reaching crisis deserves a far-reaching solution, whether it’s precisely Warren’s vision or not—and hey, we did land on the moon, didn’t we?

Kriston Capps


More on CityLab

After Rahm, What Comes Next for the Obama Library?

Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s decision to step down may give critics of the library plan more time and room to negotiate.

Zach Mortice

Mapping a Monster Storm in Real Time

As Hurricane Florence battered the Carolinas, navigation apps and mapping companies tracked road closures and evacuations.

Claire Tran

Scotland Tries for the Bilbao Effect at the New V&A Dundee

A sparkling new museum on the waterfront opens with high hopes of putting an underexposed city the map. Will it succeed?

Feargus O'Sullivan

The Black Communities That Have Fought for Their Right to Exist in the Carolinas

The African-American families embroiled in litigation against toxic animal-feeding operations join a long history of black communities fighting for the right to their health in the Carolinas.

Brentin Mock

The Museum of Broken Windows Makes a Powerful Plea for Police Reform

In a pop-up exhibition, artists and activists display personal experiences with a fraught theory of policing.

Laura Feinstein

Is Your Local Coffee Shop a Low-Key Opioid Clinic?

Overdoses in public bathrooms are turning baristas and other service workers into unwitting first responders.

Lolade Fadulu


Crossroads

A photo of commuters in Broadway Junction.
Upper Level, Broadway Junction Subway Station, Brooklyn, 2017. (Camilo José Vergara)

Broadway Junction, in the heart of Brooklyn, is the borough’s third-busiest transit station. Its design shows little regard for conventional beauty; its character comes from its maze-like layout with stained-glass windows and a sunset view of the World Trade Center. In the final installment of his “Crossroads” photo essay series, Camilo José Vergara describes Broadway Junction as an excellent setting for a New York City history lesson—a place to experience the hustle and bustle of a big-city commute. Read: Life in East New York’s Sprawling Transit Hub


What We’re Reading

Which city gets the least sleep—and how is that tied to wages? (The Guardian)

The hidden powers of composting in Baltimore (Next City)

How San Francisco planned its own housing crisis (Collectors Weekly)

How ride hailing is cutting into airports’ parking revenue (Morning Consult)

The most dangerous place to bicycle in America: Tampa Bay (Wall Street Journal)


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About the Author

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