Also: Yelp reviews can track gentrification, and the architects who made Miami “magic.”

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***

What We’re Following

Run this town: Localism is having a moment. Since the 2016 election, a chorus of city boosters has called on local governments to address big challenges that the Trump administration and states might neglect. Now many city leaders are seeking higher office, banking on the idea that voters will respond to the kinds of politics and governance that cities represent. But there are risks to this kind of rhetoric and mindset, even for those who support the movement.

Today on CityLab, the Brookings Institution’s Amy Liu writes that the trend toward localism can be self-destructive, reinforcing a deep dysfunction in federalism. “Providing an adequate safety net, supporting workers and communities facing sudden job loss, funding basic research, and ensuring a fair census and other data—only a national government can perform functions like these that ultimately enable local initiatives,” she writes. Read her perspective: The Limits of City Power in the Age of Trump.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

On Yelp, Gentrification Is in the Stars

Research based on years of Yelp reviews finds new grocery stores and coffee shops are indeed indicators of changing populations and rising home prices.

Laura Bliss

How Rahm Emanuel Blew It on Police Reform

The Chicago trial of police officer Jason Van Dyke for killing Laquan McDonald is imminent. But even a guilty verdict can’t salvage Mayor Rahm Emanuel's legacy on police reform.

Brentin Mock

The Architects Who Made Miami ‘Magic’

No one has expressed Miami’s glamour, boldness, and precarious beauty quite like Arquitectonica.

Adam Nathaniel Furman

The App That Pays You to Find a Smarter Commute

Incentrip rewards users for finding greener, more efficient ways to get to work. But can it get people to change their habits?

Linda Poon

How Officials and Citizens Can Protect the Integrity of Their Elections

The first lines of defense aren’t particularly difficult or expensive.

Douglas W. Jones


What We’re Reading

Mass transit absentia: Don’t look for Andrew Cuomo on the subway (Politico New York)

How startups in D.C. feel about Amazon’s possible move to their city (Business Insider)

New York City subway station reopens 17 years after it was destroyed during 9/11 attacks (NPR)

Quiz: Are these writers complaining about modern-day scooters or 19th century bikes? (Washington Post)


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