A woman wheels a baby stroller onto a New Jersey Transit train at Penn Station.
Mike Derer/AP

We want to hear about getting around car-free in your city.

Updated: December 01, 2018 Thanks for your interest! We’re no longer accepting submissions for this callout—but keep an eye out for upcoming coverage.

Hey readers, we need you. When we first started our series about raising tiny humans in the city, Room to Grow, we asked parents to tell us through a survey about their experience living in cities. Now, we're back with another question.

In that first survey, many of you told us that you wanted to go car-free, but were worried about the additional challenges, especially with small children. Now, we want to hear from those of you who are making it work.

Please fill out our survey below and/or share with a parent friend who might be interested to share their experiences. Your comments and stories could be included in a future CityLab article.

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