Watch CityLab’s event in Washington, D.C.

As economic inequality becomes an increasingly prominent global issue and political talking point, it is local communities that bear the burden of its impact, and that are piloting some of the most interesting new models for economic inclusivity. Follow along with CityLab’s event in Washington, D.C. as we confront some key questions about our economic futures. All times are in eastern time.

8:30am – Welcome Remarks

  • Nicole Flatow, Editor, CityLab
  • Brandee McHale, President, Citi Foundation

8:40am - Economic Development in the Age of Amazon: The New York City Story

  • Brad Lander, City Councilman for New York City
  • Nicole Flatow, Editor, CityLab

9:15am - Suburban Poverty and Services* produced by our underwriter, Citi Foundation

  • Marla Bilonick, Executive Director, Latino Economic Development Center
  • Maria Gomez, President and CEO, Mary’s Center
  • Moderator: Brandee McHale, President, Citi Foundation

9:30am - Reform in the New Suburbia

Ah, suburbia: white-picket-fenced realm of white-bread people and cookie-cutter housing. That’s the stereotype that persists in how many of us think about the places surrounding cities. But it's very far from the diverse, dynamic suburbia of today. The conversation about poverty, race, and class is no longer just about urban areas. As issues like affordable housing, transit access, and educational equity have moved to the suburbs, so, too, has momentum to address them. How are suburban communities leading the way? And in the wake of a midterm election in which the suburbs were the new swing states, how will the suburbs assert their interests on the national stage?

  • Luiz Aragon, Development Commissioner for New Rochelle, NY
  • Natali Fani-González, Montgomery County (MD) Planning Board Commissioner
  • Ed McMahon, Senior Resident Fellow, Urban Land Institute
  • Moderator: Amanda Kolson Hurley, CityLab Senior Editor; author of the forthcoming book Radical Suburbs: Experimental Living on the Fringes of the American City

10:25am – Future of Work* produced by our underwriter, Citi Foundation

  • Elizabeth Lindsey, Executive Director, Byte Back
  • Ashley Johnson, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, The Literacy Lab
  • Emcee: Brandee McHale, President, Citi Foundation

10:40am – Protecting the Vulnerable Workers of the Future

From a changing retail landscape, to the rise of the app-based gig economy, prospects for the United States' most vulnerable workers are shifting, and cities are at the forefront of instituting reforms. We'll look at first-of-their-kind laws that could serve as national models, from a minimum wage law for ride-hailing, to new protections for freelance and domestic workers. And we'll ask the question: What do low-wage workers of the future really need? And how can the cities of the future support them?

  • Irene Jor, New York Director with the National Domestic Workers Alliance
  • Brad Lander, City Councilman for New York City
  • Julia Ticona, Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Annenberg School for Communication; author of a forthcoming book on digital technologies and the labor market
  • Moderator: Sarah Holder, CityLab Staff Writer

11:35am - Closing remarks

  • Nicole Flatow, Editor, CityLab

11:40am - Networking Reception


*This session is produced by our underwriter, Citi Foundation, and not by CityLab’s editorial Staff

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