Photographer Rob Whitworth pieced together 10,000 images to capture the city's everyday movements

Via TheAtlantic.com's Video channel, check out this impressive time-lapse video of the hectic traffic patterns of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, from photographer Rob Whitworth. Here's how Whitworth describes how he got started on the project:

Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon) is an amazing up and coming city. This time lapse is a culmination of 10,000 RAW images and multiple shoots capturing some of the cities relentless energy and pace of change.

Everyone who has visited Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam knows part of the magic (love it or hate it) is in the traffic. Ever since I first set foot in HCMC I have been captivated by the cities energy. Saigon is a city on the move unlike anything I have experienced before which I wanted to capture and share.

For more work by Rob Whitworth, visit http://www.robwhitworth.co.uk/.

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