Reuters

After a failed first attempt, the city tries again

Rio de Janiero just re-launched its bike share program. It has a new name, "Bike Rio," a new look (the bikes, aptly nicknamed 'oranges' are, yes, bright orange) and, organizers hope, a new and improved chance of survival. Pedalo Rio, the city's 2009 stab, didn't go so well. This comparison should tell you why:

Number of 'Bike Pedalo' bikes stolen in the first 15 days: 56
Number of 'Bike Rio' bikes stolen in the first 15 days: 0

It was shut down a year later. The city's changed a lot about the program in the last year, modeling it after programs in Amsterdam and Paris. Here are some data points on the new plan:

Number of stations: 35
Number of stations planned for the end of the year: 60
Number of bikes: 600

And some stats on why the program might be a good thing:

Percent of Brazilians who use public transportation: 66
Percent of Brazilians who use a private car: 13

Numbers courtesy of SmartGrowth.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. 1970s apartment complex in downtown Buffalo
    Equity

    The Last Man Standing in a Doomed Buffalo Housing Complex

    After a long fight between tenants and management, John Schmidt is waiting for U.S. Marshals to drag him out of Shoreline apartments, a Brutalist project designed by Paul Rudolph.

  2. Transportation

    How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

    The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

  3. Equity

    Did Jane Jacobs Predict the Rise of Trump?

    Ever prescient, her final book outlined a coming dark age—and how to get through it.

  4. Harlequin books are pictured at a store in Ottawa.
    Life

    Want to Make It in the Gig Economy? Emulate Romance Novelists

    Their three keys to success: They welcome newcomers, they share competitive information, and they ask advice from newbies.

  5. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.