A guide to the major 2012 projects

Feeling gloomy over the slashed transportation budgets, shrinking number of bus lines and rising fares? If you need a little cheering up, there's this - a new map from the The Transport Politic that highlights every new project in the country.

 

As Yonah Freemark (one of our contributors) writes:

At least 33 metropolitan areas in the U.S. - and five in Canada - are planning to invest in new BRT, streetcar, light rail, metro rail, or commuter rail projects in 2012. Virtually every American project listed here is being at least partially funded through federal capital grants.

See a complete round-up of the projects here.

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