Two film makers capture the joys of riding in Mexico's capital

Few film-makers have captured the visceral joy of riding a bike as neatly as Rodrigo de la Mora and Darío López Ortega. The team produced a film about the thrills of riding in Mexico City. Biker Oscar Espinosa weaves through traffic as he explains why he loves to bike.

Our colleagues over at The Atlantic did a great interview with the directors, in which they explained where they found their inspiration:

It began by just wanting to tell a story about a guy who loves to ride his bike, in a lyrical form. Then, thanks to our Executive Producer Martín López (whom we have to thank for spreading the love for bicycles here at Sake), we got to meet the rider, Oscar Espinosa.  We told him about wanting to make a short film about riding; he loved the idea and we went with it.

Read the full interview here. And below, the video:

About the Author

Amanda Erickson

Amanda Erickson is a former senior associate editor at CityLab. 

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