Courtesy: Rat Free Subway

Quite possibly the world's worst photo contest.

In what is, quite possibly, the least appealing photo contest ever, the Transit Workers Union Local 100 asked riders to submit photos of the nastiest-looking vermin they encountered on their routes.

The winner, snapped on the platform of the Seventh Ave.-53rd St. station is, by basically every definition, pretty awful. Winner Michael Spivack, an architecture firm executive and photography buff, told the New York Daily News:

"I was waiting for the D train when I saw something on the platform ... The thing wasn’t moving but it was alive. I got as close as I dared to get."

His prize? A free monthly MetroCard.

The contest was called to shed light on the the union’s “New Yorkers Deserve a Rat Free Subway" campaign. It even has its own website, where users can submit disgusting rat photos, rate other disgusting rat photos and share their own tales of rat terror. But it has a serious purpose - the union is calling on the MTA to step up garbage collection and seal some of the refuse storage rooms better.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    With Trains Like Schwebebahn, No Wonder Germans Love Public Transit

    Infrastructure like this makes it clear why Germany continues to produce enthusiasm for public transit, generation after generation.

  2. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  3. Amazon HQ2

    New York’s Ejection of Amazon Is the Start of a Movement

    NYC lawmakers who led a resistance campaign against HQ2 are declaring victory. And already, they have plans to escalate their opposition to tax incentives.

  4. Equity

    Police Policy for Sale

    Lexipol, a private for-profit company, has quietly become one of the most powerful voices in American law enforcement policy.

  5. Equity

    Capturing Black Bottom, a Detroit Neighborhood Lost to Urban Renewal

    “Black Bottom Street View,” now exhibiting at the Detroit Public Library, thoughtfully displays old images of the historic African American neighborhood in its final days.