A clever idea for reclaiming the suburbs from endless driving.

WheelChange, an advocate for new, smart multi-modal transportation systems, asserts that a more sustainable future of personal transportation could be based on communications technology, smaller vehicles, and sharing. On their website, they write:

By enabling a diverse set of existing and new transportation options to work together to allow an individual access to their city, one could think of this smart multi-mobility future as being a set of stepping stones across a river, while the conventional car ownership model is more like the large and heavy bridge.

It is the brainchild of Dan Sturges, a Colorado-based transportation designer and entrepreneur.

The video below, produced by Sturges, is a very clever and fun animation of how such a system could be deployed as a tool in reforming sprawl into smarter, walkable communities.  Enjoy!

New Wheels for Joe from Dan Sturges on Vimeo.

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog.

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