A playful and silly take on the challenges of navigating an urban setting blind.

"Extreme Walks" is a goofy short film that illustrates the difficulties faced by the various types of pedestrians who may have some disability or limited mobility.

Created by Greek filmmakers Agnes Sklavos and Stelios Tatakis, the short turns navigating a city into a sort of video game, with points awarded for successful steps and points taken away for encountering hazards. They introduce three characters, representing three of the less considered types of users of the street: a mom with a kid and a stroller, a man with a bad leg and a crutch, and a blind woman. They choose the blind woman – who's given the crude moniker "Night Vision" – and her task is to negotiate her way down an Athens sidewalk.

Her trip down the block highlights some of the challenges that face blind pedestrians, from poorly trimmed street trees to illegally parked cars. [Note the Athens sidewalk paving, which seems to have bumped up lines along the entire block specifically added to aid those with limited or no vision.]

The film's not likely to take home too many awards, but it does bring some attention to the fact that sidewalks and streets have a variety of users, and what's safe for some could pose major problems for others.

Image: SteliosTatakis/YouTube

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    Electric Scooters Aren’t a Transportation Revolution Yet

    New data show a staggering rise in shared dockless e-scooter use nationwide. But commuting habits have seen little change since the dawn of micromobility.

  2. a photo of a man surveying a home garage.
    Transportation

    How Single-Family Garages Can Ease California's Housing Crisis

    Given the affordable housing crisis, California cities should encourage single-family homeowners to convert garages into apartments and accessory dwelling units.

  3. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  4. a photo of San Francisco tourists posing before the city's iconic skyline.
    Life

    Cities Don’t Have Souls. Why Do We Battle For Them?

    What do we mean when we say that the “soul of the city” is under threat? Often, it’s really about politics, nostalgia, and the fear of community change.

  5. Maria Romano stands behind one of her three children, Jennifer, 10, as she gets something to eat in their Harlem apartment in New York Thursday, June 3, 2005
    Equity

    Why HUD Wants to Restrict Assistance for Immigrants

    A proposal by Ben Carson’s agency would eject immigrant families from public housing to make way for the "most vulnerable." Housing advocates aren't buying it.