Courtesy: Kaid Benfield

Which Sweet Sixteen team stadium is in the most walkable neighborhood?

If the NCAA men's Division 1 basketball championship were decided on walkability, the Marquette Golden Eagles would be our winner, edging out in-state rival Wisconsin-Madison 95-91 in the final.

In the spirit of continuing what is becoming a tradition (see the versions I did for 2011 and 2010), I took the 16 teams remaining in the tournament and obtained Walk Scores for the arenas where they play their home games. And I played out the matchups, as you see above. The game of the tournament would be an epic national semifinal between the Kentucky Wildcats and Marquette, won by the Golden Eagles by one point, 95-94. In my imagination, I like to think the game went to overtime, and Kentucky had a one-point lead with 2.1 seconds left. Marquette ball. Jae Crowder throws a full-court bullet pass to Darius Johnson-Odom, waiting at the top of the key.  DJO dribbles once, turns, and swishes a jumper for the win as time expires.

Anyway, Marquette wins because the Bradley Center, where they play, is a downtown arena with a "walker's paradise" Walk Score score of 95. Wisconsin's and Kentucky's arenas are also located in "walker's paradises." NC State and Baylor, not so much. Here's the complete breakdown, from least walkable to most:

This post originally appeared on the NRDC Switchboard blog.

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