Reuters

At the city's new airport, which opens in June, drivers are expected to pay a higher fee.

About 3,000 taxis paraded through central Berlin on Monday to protest a (big) new extra fee for taking people to the German capital's newest airport.     

The Berlin Brandenburg International Airport is slated to open in June. Taxi drivers are expected to pay €1.50 there, instead of the 50 cents required before. "They can't just keep tightening the screws at the airports," Berlin state taxi association head Stephan Berndt told the B.Z. newspaper.

The protest made it difficult for some passengers to make their flight, but taxi drivers said they'll fight on - four new protests are planned before the opening.

Photo credit: Thomas Peter/Reuters

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