Flickr/James D. Schwartz

A local journalist offers a strange diatribe against D.C.'s bikeshare program.

At least one Washington-based journalist really dislikes his local bikeshare program.

Charles Hunt of the Washington Times put together a strange rant against Capital Bikeshare yesterday, calling it a big, fat, publicly funded failure.

Hunt introduces it as an example of broken-down socialism, later suggesting that it might even be communist:

It is one of the locking ports for those fat, red communal bicycles you see peddled all over town by commune enthusiasts. (Say that fast, and it sounds like you are saying “commun-ists.”)

He then brings the sexuality of the bikeshare users into play, using outdated references like "metrosexual" to strengthen his argument:

The bikes are shaped like the old-timey “girl bikes” without the crossbar, making them suitable for un-liberated women in skirts as well as these so-called “metrosexual” males everybody keeps talking about in these parts.

While the relatively new program is far from perfect, you'd be hard-pressed to find a Washingtonian with a more bitter or nonsensical critique of it. Capital Bikeshare was founded in 2010 and plans to have 288 stations and 2,800 bikes in four jurisdictions by the end of the year.

Top image courtesy Flickr user  James D. Schwartz

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