Germany's newest airport gets a test run before its June 3 opening.

Berlin, once a city of three airports, will pare down to just one come June.

The brand new Berlin Brandenburg airport (airport code: BER) is scheduled to open on June 3, absorbing all the flights that once traveled to Tegel (TXL), Tempelhof (THF, closed in 2008), and Berlin Schönefeld (SXF) airports. (Brandenburg will actually incorporate Schönefeld's existing southern runway, which will become the new airport's northern runway.)

The new airport had a test run of sorts earlier this week while construction continues. To practice the daily rush, officials invited volunteers to serve as passengers (dressed in green) while airport staff (blue) and supervisors (red) assisted and oversaw operations.

Via Reuters, we get a glimpse of the test run and a preview of what Berlin's new airport will look like:

Volunteers cross the main hall. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

Volunteers look at a flight information board. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

Volunteers queue up at the check-in terminal. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 

Volunteers queue up at the check-in terminal. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

Suitcases are piled up behind a check-in desk. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

A worker pauses at one of the check-in desks. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 

Workers adjust an information sign. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 

Check-in machines for German flight operator AirBerlin are pictured at the main terminal. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 

Members of the German fire brigade inspect the main terminal. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 

A worker pauses inside the main terminal. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

An air traffic controller watches from inside the new tower. REUTERS/Bernd Settnik

A general overview shows the airport tower and the tarmac. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 

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