Courtesy: Reel

A customizable "basket" that carries everything from patch kits to baguettes.

Reel, a design for DIY storage by Yeongkeun Jeong and Aareum Jeong, is the latest bike accessory that’s distracting us at work.

Yeongkeun Jeong is a young Korean designer who’s worked for everyone from Hyundai to UNIQLO. “Unlike common bicycle accessories,” he writes, “the flexibility of the band allows the user to express their style by customizing the shape of Reel.”

The concept is fairly simple. Reel comes in two parts: a long piece of strong red rope, plus a sheet of clear plastic buttons. Peel a buttons off the sheet and attach them at regular intervals along your bike’s frame (they form teeth to keep the rope in place, preventing it from sliding to the bottom of the frame). Then uncoil the rope and start looping it around the diamond-shaped hole that’s formed by your top tube, down tube, and seat tube. When you’re done, you’ll have an ad-hoc “basket” to portage everything from patch kits to baguettes (just like on the Tour!).

Although, to be frank, Reel seems like it’s tempting fate. Twisting a thick rope around your frame, only millimeters away from complex mechanical system that keep your body in motion in traffic… Well, let’s just say, we’d test it out on the sidewalk first. Ride safe!

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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