But don't ride it into oncoming trams, obviously.

All I have to say about this bike hack is you better really know your local public-transit schedule, otherwise you might wind up smashed against the windshield of an angry conductor's streetcar, traveling backward and flailing like an injured bird.

The bahnradbahnrad, which Google translates to (far as I can tell) "track bike track bike," turns the negative of accidentally slipping your bike wheel into a streetcar track and falling down into the positive of a potential straight-line commute across town. It was built by the German urban collective We Are Visual, who used it to ride the rails in Kessel like they were pumping an old-timey handcar.

There might be a slight stigma to the hacked bike if you think training wheels are uncool. How does it handle cornering, and will the wheels last for long against the constant friction of the metal grooves? Still, for an effortless ride around all the city's major destinations, this idea gets a gold sticky star.

As a commenter on Vimeo noted, something like this has been done before with children, as well as one old man who thinks he's a locomotive:

(H/t to urbanshit.)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a map of future climate risks in the U.S.
    Maps

    America After Climate Change, Mapped

    With “The 2100 Project: An Atlas for A Green New Deal,” the McHarg Center tries to visualize how the warming world will reshape the United States.

  2. Design

    New York City Will Require Bird-Friendly Glass on Buildings

    Hundreds of thousands of migratory birds smash into the city’s buildings every year. The city council just passed a bill to cut back on the carnage.

  3. photo: A man boards a bus in Kansas City, Missouri.
    Transportation

    Why Kansas City’s Free Transit Experiment Matters

    The Missouri city is the first major one in the U.S. to offer no-cost public transportation. Will a boost in subsidized mobility pay off with economic benefits?

  4. Perspective

    Why Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

    In cities like New York, Paris, Rotterdam, and soon San Francisco, car-free streets are emerging amid a growing movement.

  5. Videos

    A Wonderfully Clear Explanation of How Road Diets Work

    Planner Jeff Speck leads a video tour of four different street redesigns.

×