Reuters

Traffic Psychologists in Sao Paolo try to cheer up the city's drivers with signs, high fives, and physical affection.

Sitting in traffic can be truly misery-inducing. A group in Sao Paulo thinks they have the solution. The Traffic Psychologists are a non-profit non-governmental organization which aims to "humanize traffic and reduce the level of stress caused to drivers," according to Reuters.

They do this by, among other things, doling out free hugs and high fives to bus riders, motorcyclists and even drivers. And with good reason - Sao Paulo has notoriously bad traffic, with more than 7 million vehicles on the road, according to figures from the state transport authority Detran.

Here are some pictures of the Traffic Psychologists at work, buy Reuters photographer Nacho Doce.



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