Reuters

Artist David Cerny calls it the "London Booster."

The artist calls it the "London Booster," a bus that can actually lift itself up and down.

The sculpture, by artist David Cerny, is parked outside of the Czech Olympic headquarters where it'll live for the duration of the Games. Cerny bought the 1957 Routemaster bus in the Netherlands and spent six months fitting it with robotic arms are powered by an engine. The motion is accompanied by a recording of sounds evoked during tough physical effort.

Cerny told The Prague Post:

"I quite like the idea of a push-up," Černý told The Prague Post. "It isn't just a sporting activity used for exercising. It can also be used for punishment in the army or in prisons."

"I like the ambivalence of that and the contradiction of sporting activities. It's a complex beast."

Below, photos from Reuters photographer Petr Josek Snr.



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