In a blow to the national humor reserve, Brooklyn's 36th Street stop will no longer be wantonly tripping commuters.

In proof that one man's viral video can be another's class-action lawsuit, officials from New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority have rushed to fix a faulty subway staircase that was leg-sweeping commuters worse than an unoriginal Mortal Kombat player.

The mischievous step gained the attention of the world after Brooklyn filmmaker Dean Peterson staked it out for the sake of high comedy (see that video below). Located about halfway up a staircase at Sunset Park's 36th Street stop, the step was apparently bulging in the center to rise less than an inch higher than the other steps. Minimal as the difference was, it managed to short-circuit the autopilot aboard many subway riders and result in a classic montage of stumbling and cursing of the gods.

Peterson's video has since racked up 1.5 million plays on Vimeo, perhaps due to some people loving too-cool New Yorkers brought low by something as small as a mismatched stair. But sensing there were sprained ankles and fractured wrists looming on the horizon, last week transit authorities rushed a work crew out to 36th Street in what was "perhaps the fastest response to a customer complaint in agency history," according to the The New York Times.

The step was scheduled to be fixed this weekend and, seeing as no more hilarious footage of the subway staircase has arisen, looks like it's mission accomplished. Oh well, we'll always have the memories:.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  2. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

  3. Traffic-free Times Square in New York City
    Maps

    Mapping How Cities Are Reclaiming Street Space

    To help get essential workers around, cities are revising traffic patterns, suspending public transit fares, and making more room for bikes and pedestrians.

  4. photo: A lone tourist in Barcelona, one of several global cities that have seen a massive crash in Airbnb bookings.
    Coronavirus

    Can Airbnb Survive Coronavirus?

    The short-term rental market is reeling from the coronavirus-driven tourism collapse. Can the industry’s dominant player stage a comeback after lockdowns lift?

  5. Perspective

    Coronavirus Reveals Transit’s True Mission

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

×