A stunt driver takes a high-speed and action-packed tour of the city.

The hills and curving streets of San Francisco can make for an intimidating drive. But for drivers with an adventurous streak, the topographical weirdness of the city can make for an exciting drive. In the video below, stunt driver Ken Block takes that notion to the extreme.

On the blocked-off and empty streets of the city on a four-day set of somehow sunny days, Block and a video crew terrorized San Francisco with this high-speed, tire-burning, seatbelt-testing Tasmanian devil-spin through the streets of San Francisco.

It's the latest in a series of videos of Block engaging in "gymkhana," which according to the website of sponsor DC Shoes is "an automotive sport that requires drivers to skillfully maneuver their car around obstacles using extreme acceleration, braking and drifting."

The city becomes a stunt car playground as Block careens around sharp residential corners and weaves in between streetcars, tagging curves with black tire marks and sending gray smoke into the air like a San Francisco fog.

It's a bold comeuppance to the famous hill-jumping San Francisco car chase scene from the 1968 action thriller Bullitt.  Though that chase was a little less extreme than Block's over-the-top romp through the city, you gotta give credit to Steve McQueen for doing it in traffic.

Image credit: /YouTube

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