Jaktogo/Facebook

But you'll still look like an idiot.

Irish engineer John Power really hates paying excess luggage fees at the airport. So he did what any man would do: started packing lighter and learned to enjoy traveling without so many material objects.

Actually, no. What he did was invent a coat with more than a dozen pockets that you stuff with clothes, personal items, shoes and even a laptop. Then he strapped it on and, looking like the Michelin Man but sweatier, tumbled through airport security without paying a dime.

And now you can, too! The "Jaktogo," which also comes in dress and poncho forms, is available for purchase online for the low-low price of $109.99. Frequent flyers will no doubt love this lumpy fashion accessory that, once taken off, folds back down into a regular bag. And if you have to hold up the line by searching frantically through 14 different pockets for your passport, like Inspector Gadget searching for and failing to find some esoteric doodad, that's just the price of being a free man.

The Jaktogo is reputed to hold up to 33 pounds of luggage and is available in snazzy leather, in case you wanted to show it off at the club. Judging from this product video, it does seem to work in fending off baggage fees, although you might have to wear it throughout the duration of your flight. Whatever: You can distract yourself from the suffocating heat with that complete set of Harry Potter located in Pocket No. 11.

Top photo courtesy of Jaktogo on Facebook.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    The Problem With 'Fast-Casual Architecture'

    Washington, D.C., has a huge new waterfront development that’s fun, popular, and easy on the eyes. Is anything wrong with that?

  2. Transportation

    If You Drive Less Than 10,000 Miles a Year, You Probably Shouldn't Own a Car

    Up to one-quarter of all U.S. drivers might be better off using ride-sharing services instead.

  3. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  4. Design

    Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was

    With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.

  5. Equity

    Big Tech Ought to Step Up for Cities

    Leading high-tech firms have increasingly gone from heroes to villains in the eyes of their neighbors. It’s in their own interest to help make cities more affordable and inclusive.