Jaktogo/Facebook

But you'll still look like an idiot.

Irish engineer John Power really hates paying excess luggage fees at the airport. So he did what any man would do: started packing lighter and learned to enjoy traveling without so many material objects.

Actually, no. What he did was invent a coat with more than a dozen pockets that you stuff with clothes, personal items, shoes and even a laptop. Then he strapped it on and, looking like the Michelin Man but sweatier, tumbled through airport security without paying a dime.

And now you can, too! The "Jaktogo," which also comes in dress and poncho forms, is available for purchase online for the low-low price of $109.99. Frequent flyers will no doubt love this lumpy fashion accessory that, once taken off, folds back down into a regular bag. And if you have to hold up the line by searching frantically through 14 different pockets for your passport, like Inspector Gadget searching for and failing to find some esoteric doodad, that's just the price of being a free man.

The Jaktogo is reputed to hold up to 33 pounds of luggage and is available in snazzy leather, in case you wanted to show it off at the club. Judging from this product video, it does seem to work in fending off baggage fees, although you might have to wear it throughout the duration of your flight. Whatever: You can distract yourself from the suffocating heat with that complete set of Harry Potter located in Pocket No. 11.

Top photo courtesy of Jaktogo on Facebook.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  2. Design

    Why Amsterdam’s Canal Houses Have Endured for 300 Years

    A different kind of wealth distribution in 17th-century Amsterdam paved the way for its quintessential home design.

  3. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  4. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  5. photo: San Francisco skyline
    Equity

    Would Capping Office Space Ease San Francisco’s Housing Crunch?

    Proposition E would put a moratorium on new commercial real estate if affordable housing goals aren’t met. But critics aren’t convinced it would be effective.   

×