An Israeli designer invents a paper bike that could sell for $60 a pop.

For the ultimate in affordable green transportation, how about a bicycle made of recycled cardboard? I’m not sure I’m ready to take it on my favorite, let-it-fly descent down (Montgomery County, Maryland’s) MacArthur Boulevard but, heck, maybe I could. Israeli designer and bike enthusiast Izhar Gafni says his invention is strong enough to support a rider weighing up to 140 kilos, or a little over 300 pounds (and up to 485 pounds, according to a recent article).

From the Israeli technology blog newsgeek, as translated by Noalee Harel on NoCamels:

Gafni’s bicycle redefines the idea of green transportation in every way, being environmentally friendly from early stages of production all the way through creation of the final product. The bicycles are made out of recycled and used cardboard.

The primary use, like any bicycle, is to prevent pollution while encouraging physical activity and exercise. In an interview with Newsgeek, Gafni said that the production cost for his recycled bicycles is around $9-12 each, and he estimates it could be sold to a consumer for $60 to 90, depending on what parts they choose to add.

The key to making a paper product strong, apparently, is lots of folding. The finished bike is coated with resin and painted in what looks to me to be a tribute to Italian manufacturer Bianchi’s classic "celeste" green color.  Check out the whole story in the video:

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog.

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