A wild idea for converting an old canal in London.

Londoners who are growing bored of their typical morning commute may be in for an exciting change of pace. Alex Smith and David Lomax of Y/N Studio have proposed to revamp the city’s Regent’s Canal into a swimming commute lane. The LidoLine would convert the unused 8.6 mile waterway into a super clean stream for people to swim and sail to work. As for those pesky winter months, the team envisions the frozen lane to appeal to ice skaters too.

Ever since New York City’s High Line walkway changed the way people see urban spaces, cities around the world have been developing their own alternative green walkways. The Mayor of London recently launched a city-wide competition, asking architects and designers to create their own High Line-inspired space. While many entrants scoured the city for green plots, Y/N Studio dove right into a prominent yet underused resource: water. The LidoLine would not only encourage exercise and eco-friendly commuting, but would also revitalize a run-down industrial area with waterfront hang-outs and corporate sponsored competitions and events on floating rafts and amphitheaters.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

 

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