Flickr/Chris Breeze

Jonathan Trappe is hoping to fly from Maine to Paris in a lifeboat suspended from a handful of helium balloons.

Jonathan Trappe is hoping to fly from Maine to Paris, a distance of more than 3,000 miles, in a lifeboat suspended from a handful of helium balloons.

Crossing the Atlantic in a balloon is nothing new. The Hinderberg did it in 1937, and at one time zeppelins were considered the future of long-distance travel. But no one has ever done it in a cluster balloon. Five have died in attempts.

Here, via the Telegraph, is Trappe, who is attempting to crowd-fund the world's most ridiculous trans-Atlantic trip:

 

Top image: Flickr/Chris Breeze

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