Elvert Barnes/Flickr

The city says it happens all over the place.

Last month, the Washington Metro Area Transit Association announced it would be cutting back evening service to two stations in Southeast D.C. after rocks thrown at buses sent one driver to the hospital.

But the city contends that the transit company is being unfair. "There was nothing that points to a particular neighborhood. There were four random acts," Paul Quander, deputy mayor for public safety and justice, told the Washington Examiner.

In fact, according to the Examiner, the city has taken the unusual defense that rock-throwing is actually quite common in other neighborhoods, such as the U Street Corridor, and that there's no need to single out Anacostia.

It's not just inside the Beltway, either. There were reports yesterday of rock-throwing everywhere from Sussex to San Diego.

Top image: Flickr user Elvert Barnes.

HT Washington Examiner.

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