Elvert Barnes/Flickr

The city says it happens all over the place.

Last month, the Washington Metro Area Transit Association announced it would be cutting back evening service to two stations in Southeast D.C. after rocks thrown at buses sent one driver to the hospital.

But the city contends that the transit company is being unfair. "There was nothing that points to a particular neighborhood. There were four random acts," Paul Quander, deputy mayor for public safety and justice, told the Washington Examiner.

In fact, according to the Examiner, the city has taken the unusual defense that rock-throwing is actually quite common in other neighborhoods, such as the U Street Corridor, and that there's no need to single out Anacostia.

It's not just inside the Beltway, either. There were reports yesterday of rock-throwing everywhere from Sussex to San Diego.

Top image: Flickr user Elvert Barnes.

HT Washington Examiner.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: bicyclists in Paris during a transit strike in December.
    Transportation

    Paris Mayor: It's Time for a '15-Minute City'

    In her re-election campaign, Mayor Anne Hidalgo says that every Paris resident should be able to meet their essential needs within a short walk or bike ride.

  2. photo: a wallet full of Yen bills.
    Life

    Japan’s Lost-and-Found System Is Insanely Good

    If you misplace your phone or wallet in Tokyo, chances are very good that you’ll get it back. Here’s why.

  3. Life

    A New Typology of Global Cities

    The seven types of global cities driving the world economy.

  4. Life

    America’s Great Fitness Divide

    Healthy cities reflect our nation’s growing economic and class inequalities.

  5. photo: Masdar City in Abu Dhabi
    Environment

    What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

    At the UN’s World Urban Forum in Abu Dhabi, attendees toured Masdar City, the master-planned eco-complex designed to show off the UAE’s commitment to sustainability.

×