An Italian street artist has the perfect thing for when the bus is running late: Popping bubblewrap.

Trip Adviser describes Milan's public-transit system as "excellent." But no such system is without occasional hiccups that leave commuters stranded, twiddling their fingers over smartphones and issuing grumpy little sighs.

Artist Fra Biancoshock, whose website says he specializes in "creating unconventional experiences seen on streets of Italy," has found a solution to frustratingly late buses. He recently deployed his concept in Milan, which he calls "Antistress For Free." It's simply sheets of bubble wrap hanging on the side of a bus shelter. Bored commuters, or those with ADHD, can while away the minutes by engaging in that supremely satisfying activity of popping the bubbles.

Biancoshock is offering several sizes of wraps to correlate with how long people think they'll be S.O.L. at the bus stop. On the artist's Facebook page, the public has expressed great appreciation for his effort to alleviate crosstown woes, exclaiming "GRANDI!" and "figoooooooooo," which I can only assume is Italian for cooooooooool.

Photos taken by Myst-R and shared by the artist on Rebel Art.

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