The meaning of this little film seems to be: If your bike is stolen, it's probably being ridden by somebody who loves it a lot more than you.

The meaning of this effervescent little film seems to be: If your bike is stolen, don't fret too much. It's probably being ridden by somebody who appreciates it a lot more than you did.

If you can't get behind that galling message, there's plenty more to recommend in this playful imagining of a stolen bike's life by brothers James and Jeff Nixon. Trick riding! A tour of Chicago's better graffiti! A glance at Lottie's, a "former epicenter of payoffs, stripping and gambling in the Bucktown neighborhood"! Then there's the Harry Belafonte jam, always a potent mood-elevator.

The Nixons describe their movie this way:

A lonely bike stuck in a shop and longing for adventure and the perfect rider, Accordo's wish is granted when he's finally purchased. Will everything go according to plan? Can he survive in this harsh and brutal world? Filmed mostly on our bikes over a weekend visit to Chicago from my brother James. He's a pro.

(H/t to Brad at Urban Velo.)

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