The outgoing Secretary of Transportation will answer questions from Atlantic Cities readers here later this month.

We've long been fans of U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood's monthly question-and-answer video series, On the Go With Ray LaHood. So we're especially pleased to be hosting one of his last installments later this month here on Atlantic Cities.

It's been about a month since LaHood, one of the few Republicans to have served in President Obama's cabinet, announced that he would serve only one term, regardless of the outcome of the 2012 election. So as we await a decision on who will replace him for Obama's second term, it's a good time to ask LaHood to reflect on what he has and hadn't been able to accomplish in his role shaping federal transportation policy.

Have questions about the implementation of MAP-21 and how it relates to urban livability issues? Been wondering about the hold up on your favorite transportation infrastructure project? This could be one of your last chances to ask LaHood about it, so don't hold back.

You can submit your questions as a comment to this post. You can also post them on the secretary’s Facebook page or the Fast Lane blog. We'll collect the best questions from Cities readers and send them over to LaHood on Wednesday, Nov. 21, so be sure to post your question by then. Then keep an eye out for LaHood's answers toward the end of the month.

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