Reuters

43 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles between Wednesday and Monday.

Thanksgiving is full of family, food, and football. But the travel can stress even the happiest of holiday revelers. Forty-three million Americans will travel at least 50 miles this holiday season. More than half of those trips are by air (and most planes will be at least 90 percent full, according to Airlines for America). This is slightly up from last year.

For the most part, the weather won't interfere with travel plans, except in Chicago. Dense fog has led to the cancellation of nearly 200 flights, and 800 others are delayed.

Below, Thanksgiving scenes from around the country.

A turkey looks around its enclosure at Seven Acres Farm in North Reading. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)



Cars travel on the New Jersey turnpike near Elizabeth, New Jersey. More than 39 million Americans are expected to drive during the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, making it one of the busiest travel days of the year. (Mike Segar/Reuters)
Commuters walk through Grand Central Terminal, in New York. (Chip East/Reuters)



People whose homes were flooded during Superstorm Sandy, eat a donated Thanksgiving meal a day before the holiday at Breezy Point in the Queens. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

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