Reuters

The often miraculous ways we get our stuff (and ourselves) from one spot to another.

On paper, transportation routes look quite tidy, even between cities or across countries.

But the reality is often messier, especially in the developing world. Often a bike or back is the best way to move scores of kites, milk cartons, water jugs or even people from one spot to another. Below, an ode to this process, with pictures by Reuters photographers.

A cycle-rickshaw puller moves the wreckage of a car to a scrap yard in Siliguri. (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters)



A man transports used empty plastic cans on a horse cart to a junkyard at Panchkula. (Ajay Verma/Reuters)



Garment workers in Phnom Penh ride a van home. (Chor Sokunthea/Reuters)
A man drives a taxi loaded with bicycles and milk containers through a road in the northern Indian city of Allahabad. (Jitendra Prakash/Reuters)


 

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