Erik Trinidad/YouTube

Season's Greetings from a bicycle geek.

It's only the fifth night of Hannukah, and Christmas is still two weeks away, so there's plenty of time to come up with a great urbanist holiday card.

But you'll have to come up with something very good, because Erik Trinidad has set the bar high -- in effort if not in graphic design -- with this "virtual geoglyph" he inscribed on a map of New York.

Using Abvio Cyclemeter, a tracking app for iPhone, Trinidad biked back and forth across Midtown Manhattan, spelling out "Happy Holidays" on the way. Because of some imperfections from poor service (I'm betting he has AT&T) the end results have an squiggly quality, like a righty's left-handed scrawl. Surely, Grandma will appreciate it nonetheless.

The master of virtual geoglyphs, though, will always be Baltimore's Michael Wallace.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A crowded street outside in Boston
    Life

    Surveillance Cameras Debunk the Bystander Effect

    A new study uses camera footage to track the frequency of bystander intervention in heated incidents in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.                            

  2. A woman wheels a suitcase on a platform toward a train.
    Transportation

    In Denmark's Train Dream, the Next Big City Is Only an Hour Away

    A newly revived rail plan could see Denmark’s trains catch up with its reputation for other types of green transit.

  3. A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

    A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

  4. A photo of a refrigerator at a dollar store
    Equity

    To Save a Neighborhood, Ban a Dollar Store?

    Some local governments hope that more grocery stores will blossom in “food deserts” if the number of discount convenience retailers can be limited.

  5. Life

    Are These the Last Vape Shops in San Francisco?

    The city wants to stop the rise of teen vaping by banning the sale of Juul and other e-cigarettes. It could also mean the end of a particular kind of store.

×