Erik Trinidad/YouTube

Season's Greetings from a bicycle geek.

It's only the fifth night of Hannukah, and Christmas is still two weeks away, so there's plenty of time to come up with a great urbanist holiday card.

But you'll have to come up with something very good, because Erik Trinidad has set the bar high -- in effort if not in graphic design -- with this "virtual geoglyph" he inscribed on a map of New York.

Using Abvio Cyclemeter, a tracking app for iPhone, Trinidad biked back and forth across Midtown Manhattan, spelling out "Happy Holidays" on the way. Because of some imperfections from poor service (I'm betting he has AT&T) the end results have an squiggly quality, like a righty's left-handed scrawl. Surely, Grandma will appreciate it nonetheless.

The master of virtual geoglyphs, though, will always be Baltimore's Michael Wallace.

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