Pretty efficient, contrary to popular opinion.

Pilots often talk about lines. As in, "There's going to be a slight delay folks, but we'll have you on the ground shortly. We are currently fourth in line to land at Heathrow."

I always thought "line" was a metaphor -- how could a bunch of giant, flying steel vessels moving at hundreds of miles per hour be in line?

But this hypnotic, high-speed video of airplanes landing at London's Heathrow Airport, courtesy of YouTube user Cargospotter, reveals that the queue to touch down is both real and highly efficient. Air traffic control has never looked so good.

HT Core 77.

About the Author

Henry Grabar

Henry Grabar is a freelance writer and a former fellow at CityLab. He lives in New York.   

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