Find out exactly why LaHood believes "safety" is the number one transportation accomplishment of the first four years of President Obama's administration.

Last month, we offered our readers a chance to pose questions directly to U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. Since then, the country decided to send LaHood's boss, President Obama, back to the White House for another four years. Exactly how much longer LaHood might stick around is still an open question, but for now he remains at the helm of DOT and was kind enough to videotape his answers to a few of your questions in this latest iteration of On the Go With Ray LaHood.

Watch below to find out exactly why LaHood believes "safety" is the number one transportation accomplishment "that people will remember about the first four years of President Obama's administration."

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