A Madrid man rescues a woman who fainted onto the tracks.

After a spate of recent subway incidents in New York City — including one just this morning — it's become a very real fear: You, too, could fall or be pushed onto the tracks and get crushed by an oncoming train. Our newest harrowing tale takes us to Madrid, where one woman fainted and somersaulted below... except she got saved in the nick of time — and there's video of the whole thing.

The Spanish paper El Pais caught up with the off-duty policeman — identified only by the name Ruben — who rescued the woman. "When I picked her up she was a dead weight, she was unconscious and then when she recovered she was completely groggy, she told me she was feeling very hot and then she didn't remember any more," Ruben says. 

The woman who fainted is 51-year-old Maria Luisa. "I'm hoping to do several tests, it hurts a lot," she said, although she's still not sure why she fainted. "Suddenly I lost consciousness but I do not know why."

Here's the security-camera footage release on Tuesday by the Spanish police:

According to El Pais, the entire episode lasted about five minutes. In New York, it's been a months-long series of incidents that now span into drugs and hate crimes, with the latest person to die getting hit Tuesday morning in Times Square — although police say "no criminality" was involved. There was also the man in Queens who saved a homeless man last month, but Madrid's Ruben recalls the "subway hero" Wesley Autrey, who, in case you were wondering, is still the man.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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