Flickr/Terrazzo

Man against machine.

There are two types of subway riders in the world. Those who wonder, during an idle moment at a station, if they could beat the train to the next stop; and those who attempt to do so.

That last group, to my knowledge, has only one member: an anonymous Frenchman. In the spirit of his compatriot Phillip Petit, he has pioneered a new field in urban athletics.

In "Man vs. Subway," this mec, a GoPro camera strapped to his head, tries to beat a westbound Paris Metro 10 train between Cluny-La Sorbonne and Odéon. To do so, though, he must not only navigate the entrances to each station, he must cross the busy Boulevard Saint-Michel....

At how many pairs of stations in the world would this kind of stunt even be worth trying? We look forward to seeing imitators.

Top image: Flickr user Terrazzo.

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