It's the oldest, dumbest trick in the book.

Of all the things that happen more often in the movies than in real life -- interrupted weddings, song-and-dance numbers, funny dialogue -- there's none we're happier to keep fictional than the murderous streak of bus drivers.

People do, of course, get hit by buses off-screen and this is no laughing matter. But bus drivers in movies seem second only to motel desk clerks in the probability that they will end up killing you, whether for tragic of comedic effect. (Real-life city buses, I might add, just don't move that fast, as anyone who has ever ridden on one can tell you.)

Watch, as epic super-cutter Harry Hanraham serves up bus collisions dozens and dozens of different ways, running the trope into the ground.

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