Reuters

The country reconsiders a massive rail project.

Well that might have been much ado about nothing.

After two years of protests, the German government is reconsidering its Stuttgart 21 rail project. When it was announced in 2010, Germans hoped to create a high-speed rail link between the Baden-Württemburg capital city and Ulm. Tracks were to be moved underground, creating entirely new neighborhoods.

But officials say the project is two billion euros over budget and not nearly done yet. Der Speigel reports that:

The debacle surrounding the Berlin airport, the country's biggest public infrastructure scandal, has made headlines around the world in recent months, bringing shame to a Germany whose own construction and engineering companies are often contracted around the globe to complete projects on a similarly grand scale. Now, a second multi-billion project appears to be in jeopardy: The massive Stuttgart 21 railway project. It looks like it may be on the path to becoming the country's second outsized white elephant.

Below, images chronicling the station's rise and fall.

The clock on the Stuttgart train station tower shows five to twelve February 5, 2013. (Michael Dalder/Reuters)
General view of the Stuttgart train station and the construction site of the controversial Stuttgart 21 rail project. (Michael Dalder/Reuters)
Protest notes are attached to the fence at the construction site of the controversial transport development project "Stuttgart 21" in Stuttgart in 2011. (Michael Dalder/Reuters)
A banner is pictured in front of the railway station during a demonstration against the Stuttgart 21 project in Stuttgart. (Alex Domanski/Reuters)
Policemen use water canons to remove protestors from a park next to the Stuttgart train station, during a protest where several thousand people rallied against the demolition of the station and park to make way for the Stuttgart 21 underground railway station in 2010. (Michael Dalder/Reuters)

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