Reuters

As India contemplates a second fare hike in as many months, a Reuters photographer captures what the system means to its riders.

Last year, photographer Navesh Chitrakar spent three months traveling India's railways. His images show the vastness of the system, but also the intimate ways it is connected to the lives of Indians the country over. This is more important than ever as India contmplates raising fares for the second time in as many months. The system, one of the largest in the world, sees 9,000 passenger trains and 20 million riders each day.

People living in slums near the railway tracks use the water supply from its broken pipelines to wash clothes and take baths in Delhi. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)
Commuters disembark from crowded suburban trains during the morning rush hour at Churchgate railway station in Mumbai. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)
Commuters cross the tracks to reach the other side of the platform in Allahabad. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)
A man listens to music as he waits for his train at Churchgate railway station in Mumbai. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)

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